Plaza Serrano, that bohemian chic



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  Julieta Fraguío 14/06/2016

Located In the heart of Palermo, the area was the cradle of writers and artists. After being recycled, it became a design pole innovative with venues and fairs everywhere.

How protagonists of the modernization of Palermo Viejo, Plaza Serrano and its surroundings today are the epicenter of the Buenosairean movida. Your bohemian landscape of old houses and sunny sidewalks was recycled to become a design pole, where bars proliferate, art galleries and author venues. With these new winds, in recent decades the neighborhood and its concrete square rejuvenated to look like scenery, although the air of yesteryear is still visible among its passages and paving stones.

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Located between Jorge L. Borges streets (previously called Serrano) and Honduras, the renamed Plazoleta Julio Cortázar has known how to be a redoubt of writers and, above all, artists. In fact, on weekends painting and sculpture stands operate on its perimeter, which are spread to surrounding areas with street art. As if an open-air gallery, on the business and residential facades graffiti, stencils and murals can be seen.

Also, between exclusive shops for decoration, accessories, furniture and clothing of independent and famous brands, installed since the end of the nineties, “la placita” also offers crafts, while the pubs surrounding are transformed into clothing fairs on Saturdays and Sunday afternoons.

The avant-garde and innovation in all areas does not exclude bars or restaurants. Some of them are hidden, others just sight, but if there is something that commons them is that each one has its imprint, not only on the style, but also on their drinks and gastronomy.


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The Tiger Delta Proposes You To Spend A Day Full Of Adventures

Since spring came to the streets of the city of Buenos Aires, the sun, flowers and a certain adolescent joy invade the atmosphere of Buenos Aires.

But for those looking to enjoy the most romantic season of the year, visiting the Tigre Delta is a good alternative, especially if what you want is a nearby destination with a variety of activities to do.

A beautiful riverbank borders the meek waters of the Luján River, which Jorge Luis Borges defined in his poem The Islands of Tigre as "a river so slow that literature has been able to call it still." This tributary caresses the port peacefully, before emptying into the Río de la Plata. Clean air and a harmonious landscape decorate the architecture of the municipality.

From afar you can already see the three docks that constitute the Puerto de los Frutos, famous among local and foreign inhabitants. Every weekend thousands of people know the craftsmen's stalls where they can buy carved wood, stones, fruits, vegetables, reeds and reeds. One of the most requested regional products are wicker baskets and furniture, a crop promoted by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, as it resists flooding.



The legend tells that the name of the municipality is due to the sighting of yaguaretés (American tigers) that inhabited the area. At first, the party was called Las Conchas, although already in 1952 it became official as Tigre.

Historical data attest to the presence of Guaraní Indians who lived from fishing and corn cultivation, although other less official versions claim that the islands were hiding as smugglers.

A day in the Delta should start quietly touring the main cultural attractions.


The Art Museum, declared a Historic Monument in 1979, opens on the grounds located on the Paseo Victorica. It abounds in simple Doric columns and ornamental motifs of laurels (symbol of glory) and holm oak (sign of strength).

The permanent collection has works of Argentine figurative art from the 19th and 20th centuries, and can be enjoyed with paintings by renowned artists such as Benito Quinquela Martín, Eduardo Sívori, Antonio Berni or Raúl Soldi.

Near, we can visit the Naval Museum, created in 1892 and where we will find typical boats, old cartography, naval gallery and uniforms.



Another good way to start the tour is to start from Puerto Madero and take a boat to get to know the cosmopolitan city of Buenos Aires from the river, where you can see the port, the Hotel of the Immigrants, the Fishermen's Club and the circles of yacht and paddle in the northern part of the province of Buenos Aires. This tour can be booked at the Tangol Agency, in Florida 971, Ground Floor, Local 31, tel: 4312-7276.

Once the Delta is reached, athletes can practice rowing, kayaking, canoeing, wakeboarding and water skiing. The guides speak both Spanish and English, so there are no excuses.

At lunchtime, there are different varieties of restaurants and bars that provide a gastronomic experience according to all tastes. Japanese food, uropean center, pizzerias and grills are some of the options to share a lunch with family or friends.

The little ones have a place dedicated to them. The Costa Park is the perfect geography to enter the world of imagination. An enchanted maze, a game that emulates Aconcagua, several roller coasters, bumper boats and other amusements give it the exact magic touch to have fun with the kids. Book your ticket and transfer with Tangol. CLICK HERE

Nature, culture and history are celebrated in a space designed for tourists. “Viví Tigre”, as the official slogan says, is the perfect invitation for an incredible day.




Colon Theater

THE TREASURE OF BUENOS AIRES. FROM THE PERIMETER DRAWN UP BY THE STREETS TUCUMÁN, LIBERTAD, PJE. ARTURO TOSCANINI Y CERRITO, ONE OF THE MOST VALUABLE JEWELS THAT ADORNS THE CITY IS SHOWN: THE TEATRO COLÓN. CONSIDERED ONE OF THE FIVE MOST IMPORTANT THEATERS IN THE WORLD FOR ITS ACOUSTICS, THE COLÓN IS AN UNMISSABLE EVENT AT THE TIME TO VISIT BUENOS AIRES. ITS IMPOSING ARCHITECTURE, ITS HISTORY, ITS BEAUTY AND THE OUTSTANDING QUALITY OF THE SHOWS IT OFFERS MAKE THIS THEATER AN EMBLEMATIC SYMBOL OF ARGENTINE CULTURE.

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A LITTLE OF HISTORY. AROUND 1889, THE MAYOR OF THE CITY OF BUENOS AIRES, TORCUATO DE ALVEAR, TOOK THE INITIATIVE AND HELD A PUBLIC TENDER FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE THEATER. IMMEDIATELY, THE ITALIAN MUSICIAN AND OPERA BUSINESSMAN ANGELO FERRARI TRIUMPHS WITH HIS PROPOSAL AND, TOGETHER WITH THE ARCHITECT AND COMPATRIOT FRANCESCO TAMBURINI, THEY START THE PROJECT. THE LATTER DIED IN 1890 AND VITTORIO MEANO CONTINUED THE WORK, INTRODUCING SIGNIFICANT CHANGES. IN 1904, HIS BELGIAN DISCIPLE JULES DORMAL TOOK OVER, WHO CARRIED OUT THE INTERIOR FINISHES AND EXQUISITE ORNAMENTATION. AFTER ALMOST TWENTY YEARS OF CONSTRUCTION, THE BUILDING WAS INAUGURATED ON MAY 25, 1908 WITH THE OPERA AÍDA BY GIUSEPPE VERDI.
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AN ARCHITECTURAL GEM. VERY DISSIMILAR STYLES COME TOGETHER HARMONIOUSLY IN ITS DESIGN: THE GREEK ATTIC THAT PREDOMINATES ABROAD, THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE, THE VARIETY OF ORNAMENTATION OF FRENCH ARCHITECTURE AND THE SOLIDITY AND DISTRIBUTION TYPICAL OF GERMAN ART. REGARDING ITS SIZE, THE BUILDING OCCUPIES 8,200 M² AND THE SURFACE IS 58,000 M². THE ROOM HAS A CAPACITY FOR 2,487 SEATED SPECTATORS, DIVIDED INTO SEVEN LEVELS. AROUND THE ROOM, THE ENTRANCE HALL (FOYER), THE GOLDEN HALL, THE HALL OF BUSTS, THE WHITE HALL AND THE MUSEUM ARE LOCATED, WHICH TREASURES THE COSTUMES USED BY SOME OF THE CELEBRITIES WHO PASSED THROUGH ITS STAGE. UNLIKE OTHER THEATERS IN THE WORLD, THE COLÓN HAS EXTRAORDINARY DEPENDENCIES SUCH AS THE SUPERIOR INSTITUTE OF ART, THE CENTER FOR MUSICAL EXPERIMENTATION, THE LIBRARY AND THE WORKSHOPS, WHERE ALL THE PRODUCTION FOR THE STAGING IS CARRIED OUT. THE THEATER OFFERS GUIDED TOURS TO EXPERIENCE THE COLÓN BEHIND THE SCENES AND GET CLOSER TO THE MAGIC OF ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT STAGES IN THE WORLD. TO KNOW THE SCHEDULES AND PROGRAMMING, VISIT: & NBSP; WWW.TEATROCOLON.ORG.AR < /A>





San Telmo, That Porteña Mix

Near the House Rosada is the oldest and most bohemian neighborhood in the Federal Capital. Among antique dealers and traditional coffee shops, you still feel a genuine Buenos Aires there.

Colonial houses, cobbled streets and lanterns that illuminate narrow sidewalks are part of the landscape that San Telmo offers. Despite the real estate boom and the landing of fashion, art and gastronomy venues that were modernizing the appearance of the area, even today the neighborhood beats to the rhythm of its history. Its suburban and nostalgic air, typical of Buenos Aires, is combined with the most modern and contemporary cultural trends.

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Comprised of the streets Chile, Defensa and Piedras and the avenues Ingeniero Huergo, Brazil, Paseo Colón, Martín García y Caseros, the district owes its name the Parish of San Pedro González Telmo. However, originally, the land known as El Alto due to its high geography was a port area. & nbsp; Calle Real, today Defensa, was the busiest as it connected the banks of the Riachuelo, where the port was , with the Plaza Mayor (currently Plaza de Mayo). & nbsp; Its first settlers settled strategically on that road and at the end of the 18th century in a wasteland they established a stop for the carts that transported the merchandise. That place today is Plaza Coronel Dorrego, the neuralgic center of the neighborhood, and a key point to understand part of Argentine history. Explore the history of San Telmo with the Walking CityTours of Tangol.

The square was the scene for the oath of independence of the residents of Buenos Aires, signed in Tucumán in 1816, but it also became the epicenter from from which the most traditional patrician families of Buenos Aires were established. Its colonial mansions marked the architectural profile of the neighborhood, although the identity of the commune was the product of the working and poor classes.

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In 1871, with the yellow fever epidemic, the wealthiest residents moved north of the city and their homes became tenements. Immigrants, who at that time arrived in large contingents from different parts of Europe, rented the rooms of these huge houses to live with their families until they could progress, sharing with the others kitchen, bathroom and patio. Thus, to the overcrowding, the mixture of cultures, languages and sounds that is still conserved was added, to the point that tango and candombe are still heard on its cobblestone streets, while walking between churches of different origins and religions .

While the neighborhood was declining and was acquiring its definitive air of stately humility, the Mercado del Comercio operated in the plaza. Although this was demolished in 1897 when the current San Telmo Market was inaugurated, the perimeter always kept alive that universe of buying and selling with the creation in 1970 of the Fair of Old Things and Antiques (open every weekend) . Its inauguration finished sealing the essence of the jurisdiction, since, from its appearance, antique dealers began to proliferate in all the surroundings. Try the experience of the Bicycle Tours in the south of the City.

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Since then, they have widened avenues and demolished historical places (including the Casa del Naranjo, the oldest in the city, dating from the 17th century), but San Telmo has not lost its original perfume. Not only because many constructions with patrimonial value still exist, such as the Minimum House, the Old Warehouse or the House of the Ezeiza, among others, but also because its old man shops and tanguerías have managed to metabolize contemporary times. As a fusion space that knew how to be, rich and poor at the same time, the neighborhood, margin and center of the city, houses modern art museums and exclusive design workshops, along with warehouses and used fairs; as well as the classic cafes, in the style of Poetry, El Federal or El Británico, coexist with signature restaurants. This cocktail certainly outlines our personality. & Nbsp;

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San Telmo, A Porteño Mix

One of the oldest and most bohemian neighborhoods of Buenos Aires City lies near Casa Rosada. Among antique shops and traditional cafes, San Telmo still offers an authentic taste of Buenos Aires.

Colonial houses, cobblestone streets, and old-fashioned street lamps, which light up narrow sidewalks, make up San Telmo’s landscape. Despite the housing boom and the opening of trendy boutiques, art galleries, and restaurants, which have modernized the neighborhood’s appearance, San Telmo keeps the reminiscence of its history. Its suburban and nostalgic atmosphere—a typical characteristic of porteños—blends into the most modern and contemporary cultural trends.
Bounded by Chile, Defensa, and Piedras Streets, and Ingeniero Huergo, Brasil, Paseo Colón, Martín García, and Caseros Avenues, the district owes its name to San Pedro González Telmo Parish. However, originally, the land known as Alto—due to its elevated geography—was a port area. Real Street, today Defensa, used to be the busiest street because it connected the riverbank, where the port was, with Plaza Mayor (today Plaza de Mayo). Its first inhabitants settled down strategically on this road, and at the end of the 18th century, they set up a stop in an empty lot for horse-drawn carts used to carry goods. Today, that place is Plaza Coronel Dorrego, the neighborhood’s most important landmark and a key point to understand part of Argentina’s history.

The small square where the city’s neighbors took the oath of independence signed in Tucumán in 1816, also became the epicenter of the most traditional patrician families of Buenos Aires. Its large colonial houses shaped the architectural features of the neighborhood, although the community identity was built upon the poor and working classes.

With the yellow fever outbreak of 1871, the wealthiest residents moved to the north of the city, and their dwellings became tenement houses. The immigrants, who arrived in big waves from different parts of Europe at the time, rented the rooms of those huge houses to live with their families until they could get a better standard of living, sharing the kitchen, bathroom, and courtyard. Thus, the overcrowding added to the mixture of cultures, languages, and sounds that still remain in San Telmo, to the point that tango and candombe can still be heard today along its cobblestone streets lined with temples from different origins and religions.

While the neighborhood was falling into decline and shaping its final look of majestic modesty, the square used to serve as the Main Market. Although the market was demolished in 1897 when the current San Telmo Market was opened, the place kept alive the selling-buying concept with the creation of the Feria de Cosas Viejas y Antigüedades (Antiques and Vintage Fair) in 1970 (open every weekend). Its opening sealed the essence of the neighborhood; since it was set up, antiques dealers began to spread all over the area.

Since then, some avenues have been broadened and some historical places have been pulled down (including Casa del Naranjo, the oldest house of the city dating back to the 17th century), but San Telmo hasn’t lost its original flair. Not only because it still features some constructions with historic significance, such as Casa Mínima, Viejo Almacén, or Casa de los Ezeiza, but also because the neighborhood’s antiques, vintage and second-hand stores, as well as its tango parlors (tanguerías), have managed to blend into contemporaneity. As a fusion place, which was rich and poor at the same time, the neighborhood—the city’s edge and center—houses modern art museums and a variety of workshops of exclusive designs, together with grocery stores and flea markets; as well as traditional cafes such as La Poesía, El Federal, or El Británico, that coexist with signature restaurants. This cocktail certainly defines our personality in a few blocks. 





Used Book Fairs

IN THE CITY, STORIES PROLIFERATE AT LOW COST. READERS AND BOOKSELLERS COME TOGETHER IN THE MARKETS TO GIVE AND GET STORIES. IN ADDITION TO LITERATURE, IN EACH POSITION YOU CAN FIND AN EXPERIENCE. & NBSP;

BUENOS AIRES HAS KNOWN HOW TO BE THE SETTING AND HE IS ONE OF THE BEST PAGES IN LITERATURE, BUT HE WAS ALSO ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PUBLISHING CENTERS IN LATIN AMERICA IN THE SIXTIES AND SEVENTIES. THE EDITORIAL BOOM WAS CLOSED BY THE 1976 MILITARY DICTATORSHIP, BUT THE REALITY IS THAT PORTEÑOS HAVE NEVER STOPPED READING. AMONG ROMANTICS, SOME PREFER BOOKSTORES OPEN UNTIL LATE ON CORRIENTES STREET, ALTHOUGH OTHERS FIND THEIR PLACE IN THE WORLD AT USED FAIRS. & NBSP;

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THE STALLS OF THE RIVADAVIA AND CENTENARIO PARKS, LOCATED IN THE CABALLITO NEIGHBORHOOD, AS WELL AS THOSE OF PLAZA ITALIA, IN THE HEART OF PALERMO, ARE THE MOST POPULAR. IN THE THREE WALKS, EACH WITH ITS IDENTITY AND IMPRINT, YOU CAN BUY NEW AND OLD COPIES AT CHEAPER PRICES. HOWEVER, MORE THAN THE SALES, AMONG THE NOVELTIES, THE CLASSICS AND THE ODDITIES THAT COEXIST WAITING TO BE THE NEXT GREAT FIND, WHAT YOU ACQUIRE ARE MOMENTS AND EXPERIENCES. & NBSP;
CHAT WITH THE BOOKSELLERS, HAGGLING AND RECOMMENDATIONS, GETTING A BOOK THERE IS MORE THAN A BUYING AND SELLING TRANSACTION. A SPECIAL PLACE FOR TREASURE HUNTERS OR NOSTALGICS, IN THESE FAIRS, IN ADDITION, THE PAPER HAS ITS COLOR, SMELL AND HISTORY. MIGRANT CAT AROMAS, WITH A HINT OF CONFINEMENT AND SEPIA SCENTS ARE FELT IN THE HALLWAYS, WHERE THE DEDICATED PAGES AND UNDERLINED PHRASES MARK OTHER SENSIBILITIES AND TEMPORALITIES. & NBSP;
SPACES IN WHICH OTHER PEOPLE'S STORIES AND THEIR OWN MIX, THE USED MARKETS THUS BUILD A CITY OF TALES. & NBSP;





The 8 Historic Coffees of Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires owes much of its charm to its legendary coffees. The city of Buenos Aires has more than 20 notable bars that make up the Cultural Heritage of the city. The notable bars of Buenos Aires are the living history of the city: for its age and architectural value, for being the scene of relevant historical and cultural events. You can find them in different neighborhoods of the city but especially in the most classic area: Almagro, San Telmo, San Nicolas, La Boca and Recoleta.










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